Centre for astrology astrobiology and astro physics 

Jyotisha (or Jyotishyam from Sanskrit jyotiṣa, from jyótis- "mild, heavenly body") is the conventional machine of astrology, additionally known as , Indian astrology, and extra lately Vedic astrology. The time period Hindu astrology has been in use because the English equivalent of Jyotiṣa because the early 19th century, whereas Vedic astrology is a quite current time period, getting into not unusual utilization within the Eighties with self-help publications on Āyurveda or Yoga. Vedanga Jyotisha is one of the earliest texts about astronomy inside the Vedas but, historic documentation shows that horoscopic astrology within the Indian subcontinent got here from Hellenistic influences, submit-courting the Vedic length.Jyotisha has been divided into 3 principal branches: Siddhānta: Indian astronomy, calculating the placement of the planets and other heavenly our bodies. Hindu calendar (Pānchānga) is constructed from that calculation. 'Siddhāntā Sirómāni' and 'Sūryā Śiddhāntā' are foremost books on Hindu astronomy. In step with this theory, the earth is motionless and it isn't always considered as a planet. Seven planets (Moon, Mercury, Venus, sun, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn) revolve across the earth. Samhitā: Mundane astrology, predicting essential activities related to countries which include warfare, earthquakes, political activities, economic positions, residence and production associated topics (Vāstu Śāstra), animals, portents, omens, and so on. It is also involved with the calculation of Sūbhā Mūhūrtā for Brātā, pārbā and Sānskārā. Horā or 'Jātakā': Predictive astrology wherein the astrologer makes predictions approximately future occasions in someone's existence primarily based on a birth chart (Jānmā okayūndāli) which information the exact time of beginning and the positions of the planets on the time. Jyotiṣa is one of the Vedāṅga, the six auxiliary disciplines used to aid Vedic rituals. Early jyotiṣa is worried with the instruction of a calendar to restoration the date of sacrificial rituals. nothing is written on planets.There are mentions of eclipse causing "demons" in the Atharvaveda and Chāndogya Upaniṣadvert, the Chāndogya mentioning Rāhu. In fact the time period graha, that is now taken to mean planet, firstly meant demon. The Ṛigveda also mentions an eclipse inflicting demon, Svarbhānu, but the specific time period of "graha" becomes carried out to Svarbhānu within the later Mahābhārata and Rāmāyaṇa.


The muse of Hindu astrology is the belief of bandhu of the Vedas, (scriptures), which is the relationship between the microcosm and the macrocosm. Exercise relies broadly speaking on the sidereal zodiac, which is different from the tropical zodiac utilized in Western (Hellenistic) astrology in that an ayanāṁśa adjustment is made for the sluggish precession of the vernal equinox. Hindu astrology includes numerous nuanced sub-systems of interpretation and prediction with factors no longer observed in Hellenistic astrology, consisting of its machine of lunar mansions (Nakṣatra). It was most effective after the transmission of Hellenistic astrology that the order of planets in India became fixed in that of the seven-day week. Hellenistic astrology and astronomy additionally transmitted the twelve zodiacal signs starting with Aries and the twelve astrological locations beginning with the ascendant. the primary evidence of the introduction of Greek astrology to India is the Yavanajātaka which dates to the early centuries CE.[ The Yavanajātaka ("Sayings of the Greeks") was translated from Greek to Sanskrit through Yavaneśvara at some point of the 2nd century CE, under the patronage of the Western Satrap Saka king Rudradaman I, and is considered the first Indian astrological treatise within the Sanskrit language. but the handiest model that survives is the later verse model of Sphujidhvaja which dates to advert 270. the first Indian astronomical textual content to outline the weekday changed into the Āryabhaṭīya of Āryabhaṭa according to Michio Yano, Indian astronomers ought to have been fascinated with the challenge of Indianizing and Sanskritizing Greek astronomy during the three hundred or so years between the first Yavanajataka and the Āryabhaṭīya. The astronomical texts of these three hundred years are lost.The later Pañcasiddhāntikā of Varāhamihira summarizes the five acknowledged Indian astronomical schools of the 6th century. it's miles thrilling to be aware that Indian astronomy preserved some of the older pre-Ptolemaic elements of Greek astronomy. Astrology a should and must life tool to be used . By the time we integrate fully ,you can have life predictions here , accordingly you can have measures if it is alarming .The plan is to introduce astrological life sciences, the new stream of study . It will dissiminate the light that astro can be integrated in accordance to create the sustanable biological life on earth . The life on earth , has to travel a gigantic time ahead .. and this the earth , we need to explore for life support , it is waste of time to wait to see the resultant of exploration of the sky as the life is very small and its objective is very vast , it has to act fast to attain the ultimacy . Biological life has been designed in such a manner (very very delicate) that if it has a way ahead it will proceed further in its original form other wise it will get vanished . , Scientific theories on bilological evolution may be myth . Bilological universe donnot give ample opportunity for its own evolution as for as physical form is concern ,because of its very very perishable in its nature .Every individual biological entity meant for certian purpose , may be environment effect can leads to it variety , variety in univesal phenomenon , it does not mean that they are evoluted one . There is some thing in the parllael to physical biliology that gets evoluted .

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Astronomy News -- ScienceDaily

Presumed young star turns out to be a galactic senior citizen

49 Lib, a relatively bright star in the southern sky, is twelve billion years old rather than just 2.3 billion. For many decades, researchers were stumped by conflicting data pertaining to this celestial body, because they had estimated it as much younger than it really is. Determining its age anew, astronomers have now successfully resolved all inconsistencies. Posted: Mon 16th of January, 2017

Understanding blended galaxies

Galaxies are merging all the time, even our own galaxy, the Milky Way. But how these mergers occur isn't entirely clear. An American astrophysicist will use a National Science Foundation grant to find and characterize supermassive black holes associated with merging galaxies. Posted: Thu 12th of January, 2017

Searching for planets in the Alpha Centauri system

Astronomers are conducting a search for planets in the nearby star system Alpha Centauri. Such planets could be the targets for an eventual launch of miniature space probes by the Breakthrough Starshot initiative. Posted: Thu 12th of January, 2017

Our galaxy's black hole is spewing out planet-size 'spitballs'

Every few thousand years, an unlucky star wanders too close to the black hole at the center of the Milky Way. The black hole's powerful gravity rips the star apart, sending a long streamer of gas whipping outward. That would seem to be the end of the story, but it's not. New research shows that not only can the gas gather itself into planet-size objects, but those objects then are flung throughout the galaxy in a game of cosmic 'spitball.' Posted: Wed 11th of January, 2017

Farthest stars in Milky Way might be ripped from another galaxy

The 11 farthest known stars in our galaxy are located about 300,000 light-years from Earth, well outside the Milky Way's spiral disk. New research shows that half of those stars might have been ripped from another galaxy: the Sagittarius dwarf. Moreover, they are members of a lengthy stream of stars extending one million light-years across space, or 10 times the width of our galaxy. Posted: Wed 11th of January, 2017

Struggle to escape distant galaxies creates giant halos of scattered photons

Astronomers have discovered giant halos around early Milky Way type galaxies, made of photons (elementary particles of light) that have struggled to escape them. Posted: Wed 11th of January, 2017

Next-generation optics offer the widest real-time views of vast regions of the sun

A groundbreaking new optical device to correct images of the Sun distorted by multiple layers of atmospheric turbulence, is providing scientists with the most precisely detailed, real-time pictures to date of solar activity occurring across vast stretches of the star's surface. Posted: Tue 10th of January, 2017

Hubble's front row seat when galaxies collide

IRAS 14348-1447 is actually a combination of two gas-rich spiral galaxies doomed by gravity to affect and tug at each other and slowly, destructively, merge into one. Posted: Tue 10th of January, 2017

How a moon slows the decay of Pluto's atmosphere

A new study provides additional insight into relationship between Pluto and its moon, Charon, and how it affects the continuous stripping of Pluto's atmosphere by solar wind. When Charon is positioned between the sun and Pluto, the research indicates that the moon can significantly reduce atmospheric loss. Posted: Mon 9th of January, 2017

How Earth's previous moons collided to form the moon: New theory

A new theory suggests the Moon we see every night is not Earth's first moon, but rather the last in a series of moons that orbited our planet. Moons formed through the process could cross orbits, collide and merge, slowly building the bigger moon we see today. Posted: Mon 9th of January, 2017

High energy x-rays used to peer beneath the obscuring skin of growing black holes

A black hole under investigation is so hidden that it requires highly sensitive observations in the highest energy X-rays to classify it as obscured. But they give themselves away when material they feed on emits high-energy X-rays that NASA's NuSTAR (Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array) mission can detect. That's how astronomers used NuSTAR to recently identify a gas-enshrouded supermassive black holes located at the center of a nearby galaxy IC 3639 some 175 million light years from Earth. Posted: Sun 8th of January, 2017

Hubble captures 'shadow play' caused by possible planet

Astronomers have been surprised to see a huge shadow sweeping across a disk of dust and gas encircling the nearby, young star TW Hydrae. They have a bird's-eye view of the disk, because it is tilted face-on to Earth, and the shadow sweeps around the disk like the hands moving around a clock. But, unlike the hands of a clock, the shadow takes 16 years to make one rotation. Hubble has 18 years' worth of observations of the star; therefore, astronomers could assemble a time-lapse movie of the shadow's rotation. Posted: Sat 7th of January, 2017

Hubble detects 'exocomets' taking the plunge into a young star

Interstellar forecast for a nearby star: Raining comets! NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has discovered comets plunging onto the star HD 172555, which is a youthful 23 million years old and resides 95 light-years from Earth. Posted: Fri 6th of January, 2017

Research supports role of supernovas in measuring pace at which the universe expands

A team of research scientists recently published a paper marking the importance of Type Ia supernovas in measuring the pace at which the universe expands. Type Ia supernovas are among the very brightest cosmic explosions visible, signaling the death of stars, and their importance to cosmology cannot be understated. Posted: Fri 6th of January, 2017

Solar storms could spark soils at moon's poles

Powerful solar storms can charge up the soil in frigid, permanently shadowed regions near the lunar poles, and may possibly produce 'sparks' that could vaporize and melt the soil, perhaps as much as meteoroid impacts, according to new research. This alteration may become evident when analyzing future samples from these regions that could hold the key to understanding the history of the moon and solar system. Posted: Fri 6th of January, 2017

Hubble provides interstellar road map for Voyagers' galactic trek

Astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have measured the material along the Voyager 1 and 2 probes' trajectories as they move through space. Hubble data, combined with the Voyagers, have also provided new insights into how our sun travels through interstellar space. Posted: Fri 6th of January, 2017

Astronomers discover cosmic double whammy

Astronomers have discovered a cosmic one-two punch never seen before. By combining data from some of the best X-ray, optical and radio telescopes in the world, researchers have found out what happens when matter ejected by a giant black hole is swept up in the merger of two enormous galaxy clusters. Posted: Fri 6th of January, 2017

Deepest X-ray image ever reveals black hole treasure trove

An unparalleled image from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory is giving astronomers the best look yet at the growth of black holes over billions of years beginning soon after the Big Bang. This is the deepest X-ray image ever obtained, collected with about 7 million seconds, or 11 and a half weeks, of Chandra observing time. Posted: Thu 5th of January, 2017

NASA moon data provides more accurate 2017 eclipse path

Thanks to elevation data of the moon from NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO, coupled with detailed NASA topography data of Earth, we have the most accurate maps of the path of totality for any eclipse to date. Posted: Thu 5th of January, 2017

Role of supernovae in clocking the universe

New research by cosmologists confirms the accuracy of Type Ia supernovae in measuring the pace at which the universe expands. The findings support a widely held theory that the expansion of the universe is accelerating and such acceleration is attributable to dark energy. The findings counter recent headlines that Type Ia supernova cannot be relied upon to measure the expansion of the universe. Posted: Wed 4th of January, 2017

Astrophysics News -- ScienceDaily

Presumed young star turns out to be a galactic senior citizen

49 Lib, a relatively bright star in the southern sky, is twelve billion years old rather than just 2.3 billion. For many decades, researchers were stumped by conflicting data pertaining to this celestial body, because they had estimated it as much younger than it really is. Determining its age anew, astronomers have now successfully resolved all inconsistencies. Posted: Mon 16th of January, 2017

Understanding blended galaxies

Galaxies are merging all the time, even our own galaxy, the Milky Way. But how these mergers occur isn't entirely clear. An American astrophysicist will use a National Science Foundation grant to find and characterize supermassive black holes associated with merging galaxies. Posted: Thu 12th of January, 2017

Recreating conditions inside stars with compact lasers

Extreme conditions inside stars can only be recreated in the laboratory through fusion experiments with the world's largest lasers, which are the size of stadiums. Now, scientists have conducted an experiment that offers a new path to creating such extreme conditions, with much smaller, compact lasers that use ultra-short laser pulses irradiating arrays of aligned nanowires. Posted: Thu 12th of January, 2017

Our galaxy's black hole is spewing out planet-size 'spitballs'

Every few thousand years, an unlucky star wanders too close to the black hole at the center of the Milky Way. The black hole's powerful gravity rips the star apart, sending a long streamer of gas whipping outward. That would seem to be the end of the story, but it's not. New research shows that not only can the gas gather itself into planet-size objects, but those objects then are flung throughout the galaxy in a game of cosmic 'spitball.' Posted: Wed 11th of January, 2017

Farthest stars in Milky Way might be ripped from another galaxy

The 11 farthest known stars in our galaxy are located about 300,000 light-years from Earth, well outside the Milky Way's spiral disk. New research shows that half of those stars might have been ripped from another galaxy: the Sagittarius dwarf. Moreover, they are members of a lengthy stream of stars extending one million light-years across space, or 10 times the width of our galaxy. Posted: Wed 11th of January, 2017

Struggle to escape distant galaxies creates giant halos of scattered photons

Astronomers have discovered giant halos around early Milky Way type galaxies, made of photons (elementary particles of light) that have struggled to escape them. Posted: Wed 11th of January, 2017

Hubble's front row seat when galaxies collide

IRAS 14348-1447 is actually a combination of two gas-rich spiral galaxies doomed by gravity to affect and tug at each other and slowly, destructively, merge into one. Posted: Tue 10th of January, 2017

High energy x-rays used to peer beneath the obscuring skin of growing black holes

A black hole under investigation is so hidden that it requires highly sensitive observations in the highest energy X-rays to classify it as obscured. But they give themselves away when material they feed on emits high-energy X-rays that NASA's NuSTAR (Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array) mission can detect. That's how astronomers used NuSTAR to recently identify a gas-enshrouded supermassive black holes located at the center of a nearby galaxy IC 3639 some 175 million light years from Earth. Posted: Sun 8th of January, 2017

Hubble captures 'shadow play' caused by possible planet

Astronomers have been surprised to see a huge shadow sweeping across a disk of dust and gas encircling the nearby, young star TW Hydrae. They have a bird's-eye view of the disk, because it is tilted face-on to Earth, and the shadow sweeps around the disk like the hands moving around a clock. But, unlike the hands of a clock, the shadow takes 16 years to make one rotation. Hubble has 18 years' worth of observations of the star; therefore, astronomers could assemble a time-lapse movie of the shadow's rotation. Posted: Sat 7th of January, 2017

Hubble detects 'exocomets' taking the plunge into a young star

Interstellar forecast for a nearby star: Raining comets! NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has discovered comets plunging onto the star HD 172555, which is a youthful 23 million years old and resides 95 light-years from Earth. Posted: Fri 6th of January, 2017

Research supports role of supernovas in measuring pace at which the universe expands

A team of research scientists recently published a paper marking the importance of Type Ia supernovas in measuring the pace at which the universe expands. Type Ia supernovas are among the very brightest cosmic explosions visible, signaling the death of stars, and their importance to cosmology cannot be understated. Posted: Fri 6th of January, 2017

Hubble provides interstellar road map for Voyagers' galactic trek

Astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have measured the material along the Voyager 1 and 2 probes' trajectories as they move through space. Hubble data, combined with the Voyagers, have also provided new insights into how our sun travels through interstellar space. Posted: Fri 6th of January, 2017

Astronomers discover cosmic double whammy

Astronomers have discovered a cosmic one-two punch never seen before. By combining data from some of the best X-ray, optical and radio telescopes in the world, researchers have found out what happens when matter ejected by a giant black hole is swept up in the merger of two enormous galaxy clusters. Posted: Fri 6th of January, 2017

Deepest X-ray image ever reveals black hole treasure trove

An unparalleled image from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory is giving astronomers the best look yet at the growth of black holes over billions of years beginning soon after the Big Bang. This is the deepest X-ray image ever obtained, collected with about 7 million seconds, or 11 and a half weeks, of Chandra observing time. Posted: Thu 5th of January, 2017

Role of supernovae in clocking the universe

New research by cosmologists confirms the accuracy of Type Ia supernovae in measuring the pace at which the universe expands. The findings support a widely held theory that the expansion of the universe is accelerating and such acceleration is attributable to dark energy. The findings counter recent headlines that Type Ia supernova cannot be relied upon to measure the expansion of the universe. Posted: Wed 4th of January, 2017

Fast radio burst tied to distant dwarf galaxy, and perhaps magnetar

Since first detected 10 years ago, fast radio bursts have puzzled astronomers. Unlike pulsars, they flash irregularly, most only once, and only for milliseconds. And they seem to come from outside the galaxy, meaning they are very energetic. A team of astronomers has now localized the only repeating burst, to a distant dwarf galaxy. The researcher who created the rapid data collection and analysis software sees a connection to magnetars. Posted: Wed 4th of January, 2017

First look at new, extremely rare galaxy

Approximately 359 million light-years from Earth, there is a galaxy with an innocuous name (PGC 1000714) that doesn't look quite like anything astronomers have observed before. New research provides a first description of a well-defined elliptical-like core surrounded by two circular rings -- a galaxy that appears to belong to a class of rarely observed, Hoag-type galaxies. Posted: Wed 4th of January, 2017

Hidden secrets of Orion's clouds

This spectacular new image is one of the largest near-infrared high-resolution mosaics of the Orion A molecular cloud, the nearest known massive star factory, lying about 1350 light-years from Earth. It reveals many young stars and other objects normally buried deep inside the dusty clouds. Posted: Wed 4th of January, 2017

Hubble gazes at a cosmic 'megamaser'

This entire galaxy essentially acts as an astronomical laser that beams out microwave emission rather than visible light (hence the 'm' replacing the 'l'). Posted: Thu 29th of December, 2016

Hubble chases a small stellar galaxy in the Hunting Dog

Lurking in the constellation of Canes Venatici or The Hunting Dog, NGC 4707 lies roughly 22 million light-years from Earth. Posted: Thu 22nd of December, 2016

Cosmology News -- ScienceDaily

Presumed young star turns out to be a galactic senior citizen

49 Lib, a relatively bright star in the southern sky, is twelve billion years old rather than just 2.3 billion. For many decades, researchers were stumped by conflicting data pertaining to this celestial body, because they had estimated it as much younger than it really is. Determining its age anew, astronomers have now successfully resolved all inconsistencies. Posted: Mon 16th of January, 2017

Understanding blended galaxies

Galaxies are merging all the time, even our own galaxy, the Milky Way. But how these mergers occur isn't entirely clear. An American astrophysicist will use a National Science Foundation grant to find and characterize supermassive black holes associated with merging galaxies. Posted: Thu 12th of January, 2017

Struggle to escape distant galaxies creates giant halos of scattered photons

Astronomers have discovered giant halos around early Milky Way type galaxies, made of photons (elementary particles of light) that have struggled to escape them. Posted: Wed 11th of January, 2017

High energy x-rays used to peer beneath the obscuring skin of growing black holes

A black hole under investigation is so hidden that it requires highly sensitive observations in the highest energy X-rays to classify it as obscured. But they give themselves away when material they feed on emits high-energy X-rays that NASA's NuSTAR (Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array) mission can detect. That's how astronomers used NuSTAR to recently identify a gas-enshrouded supermassive black holes located at the center of a nearby galaxy IC 3639 some 175 million light years from Earth. Posted: Sun 8th of January, 2017

Research supports role of supernovas in measuring pace at which the universe expands

A team of research scientists recently published a paper marking the importance of Type Ia supernovas in measuring the pace at which the universe expands. Type Ia supernovas are among the very brightest cosmic explosions visible, signaling the death of stars, and their importance to cosmology cannot be understated. Posted: Fri 6th of January, 2017

Astronomers discover cosmic double whammy

Astronomers have discovered a cosmic one-two punch never seen before. By combining data from some of the best X-ray, optical and radio telescopes in the world, researchers have found out what happens when matter ejected by a giant black hole is swept up in the merger of two enormous galaxy clusters. Posted: Fri 6th of January, 2017

Deepest X-ray image ever reveals black hole treasure trove

An unparalleled image from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory is giving astronomers the best look yet at the growth of black holes over billions of years beginning soon after the Big Bang. This is the deepest X-ray image ever obtained, collected with about 7 million seconds, or 11 and a half weeks, of Chandra observing time. Posted: Thu 5th of January, 2017

Role of supernovae in clocking the universe

New research by cosmologists confirms the accuracy of Type Ia supernovae in measuring the pace at which the universe expands. The findings support a widely held theory that the expansion of the universe is accelerating and such acceleration is attributable to dark energy. The findings counter recent headlines that Type Ia supernova cannot be relied upon to measure the expansion of the universe. Posted: Wed 4th of January, 2017

Supercluster of galaxies near Milky Way

Astronomers have found one of the Universe's biggest superclusters of galaxies near the Milky Way. The Vela supercluster, which had previously gone undetected as it was hidden by stars and dust in the Milky Way, is a huge mass that influenced the motion of our Galaxy. Posted: Wed 21st of December, 2016

First light for band 5 at ALMA

The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in Chile has begun observing in a new range of the electromagnetic spectrum. This has been made possible thanks to new receivers installed at the telescope's antennas, which can detect radio waves with wavelengths from 1.4 to 1.8 millimeters -- a range previously untapped by ALMA. This upgrade allows astronomers to detect faint signals of water in the nearby Universe. Posted: Wed 21st of December, 2016

First look at birthplaces of most current stars

Distant galaxies can be seen as they were when most of today's stars were being born, report scientists, answering longstanding questions about mechanisms of star formation billions of years ago. Posted: Tue 20th of December, 2016

Festive nebulae light up Milky Way Galaxy satellite

The sheer observing power of the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope is rarely better illustrated than in an image such as this. This glowing pink nebula, named NGC 248, is located in the Small Magellanic Cloud, just under 200 000 light-years away and yet can still be seen in great detail. Posted: Tue 20th of December, 2016

New antimatter breakthrough to help illuminate mysteries of the Big Bang

Physicists have conducted the first precision study of antihydrogen, the antimatter equivalent of hydrogen. Posted: Tue 20th of December, 2016

Astronomers release largest digital survey of the visible universe

The world's largest digital survey of the visible Universe, mapping billions of stars and galaxies, has been publicly released. Posted: Mon 19th of December, 2016

No trace of dark matter in gamma-ray background

Researchers have just published the most precise analysis of the fluctuations in the gamma-ray background to date. By making use of more than six years of data, the researchers found two different source classes contributing to the gamma-ray background. No traces of a contribution of dark matter particles were found in the analysis. Posted: Mon 19th of December, 2016

Population of neutron stars can generate gravitational waves continuously

A population of neutron stars has a spin rate that is much higher than that calculated by the conventional method, say scienitsts. Gravitational waves continuously emitted by the star bring this high spin rate down to within the observed range. Posted: Wed 14th of December, 2016

Magnetic mirror could shed new light on gravitational waves and the early universe

Researchers have created a new magnetic mirror-based device that could one day help cosmologists discover new details about ripples in space-time known as gravitational waves, particularly those emitted when the universe was extremely young. Posted: Tue 13th of December, 2016

Dark matter may be smoother than expected

Analysis of a giant new galaxy survey suggests that dark matter may be less dense and more smoothly distributed throughout space than previously thought. An international team used data from the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS) to study how the light from about 15 million distant galaxies was affected by the gravitational influence of matter on the largest scales in the universe. Posted: Wed 7th of December, 2016

Second-generation stars identified, giving clues about their predecessors

Astronomers have identified what they believe to be the second generation of stars, shedding light on the nature of the universe's first stars. Posted: Tue 6th of December, 2016

Embryonic cluster galaxy immersed in giant cloud of cold gas

Astronomers studying a cluster of still-forming protogalaxies seen as they were more than 10 billion years ago have found that a giant galaxy in the center of the cluster is forming from a surprisingly-dense soup of molecular gas. Posted: Thu 1st of December, 2016