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Centre for philosophical psychology

Today’s peripheral psychology for example cognitive psychology the general to general knowledge.

Traditionally, cognitive psychology includes human perception, attention, learning, memory, concept formation, reasoning, judgment and decision-making, problem solving, and language processing. For some, social and cultural factors, emotion, consciousness, animal cognition, evolutionary approaches have also become part of cognitive psychology. Cognitive psychology is the scientific investigation of human cognition, that is, all our mental abilities – perceiving, learning, remembering, thinking, reasoning, and understanding. The term “cognition” stems from the Latin word “ cognoscere” or "to know". Fundamentally, cognitive psychology studies how people acquire and apply knowledge or information. It is closely related to the highly interdisciplinary cognitive science and influenced by artificial intelligence, computer science, philosophy, anthropology, linguistics, biology, physics, and neuroscience. Cognitive psychology research has produced an extensive body of principles, representations, and algorithms. Successful applications range from custom-built expert systems to mass-produced software and consumer electronics: (1) Development of computer interfaces that collaborate with users to meet their information needs and operate as intelligent agents, (2)Development of a flexible information infrastructure based on knowledge representation and reasoning methods, (3) Development of smart tools in the financial industry, (4) Development of mobile, intelligent robots that can perform tasks usually reserved for humans, (5) Development of bionic components of the perceptual and cognitive neural system such as cochlear and retinal implants. Till this point , it assist the human daily life physical need. There is need with in the human to develop positive psychology . Unifying practice here will disseminate ample light about its existence in comman public in its true form the then philosophical psychology toword the eternity, base to last

   

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Psychology Research News -- ScienceDaily

Teach yourself everyday happiness with imagery training

Researchers have found that self-guided positive imagery training can successfully combat negative emotions in our daily lives. This tool is so powerful that it also changes the way our brain functions. Posted: Fri 24th of February, 2017

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

Several newly discovered variants of a gene increase the risk of developing anxiety disorders. A research team aims to derive new therapies from this finding which are better tailored to the individual patients. Posted: Fri 24th of February, 2017

Regular aerobic exercise beginning in middle age may lessen severity of stroke in old age

Regular aerobic exercise may protect the collateral circulation and lessen the severity of strokes later in life. Posted: Fri 24th of February, 2017

Sugar's 'tipping point' link to Alzheimer's disease revealed

For the first time a molecular 'tipping point' has been demonstrated in Alzheimer's, linking high blood sugar with this debilitating disease. Posted: Thu 23rd of February, 2017

Playing favorites: Brain cells prefer one parent's gene over the other's

It has long been thought that each copy of our DNA instructions -- one inherited from mom and one from dad -- is treated the same. A new study shows that it is not uncommon for cells in the brain to preferentially activate one copy over the other. The finding breaks basic tenants of classic genetics and suggests new ways in which genetic mutations might cause brain disorders. Posted: Thu 23rd of February, 2017

Fructose is generated in the human brain

Fructose, a form of sugar linked to obesity and diabetes, is converted in the human brain from glucose, according to a new study. The finding raises questions about fructose's effects on the brain and eating behavior. Posted: Thu 23rd of February, 2017

Sons of cocaine-using fathers have profound memory impairments

Fathers who use cocaine at the time of conceiving a child may be putting their sons at risk of learning disabilities and memory loss. The researchers say the findings reveal that drug abuse by fathers -- separate from the well-established effects of cocaine use in mothers -- may negatively impact cognitive development in their male offspring. Posted: Thu 23rd of February, 2017

Studies show that the cerebellum is crucial to understanding vulnerability to drug addiction

The cerebellum, contrary to what was thought, fulfils functions that go beyond the motor sphere and can be co-responsible for the brain alterations associated with addictive consumption of drugs, research shows. The findings would represent a step forward towards the design of new therapies for the future, say the investigators. Posted: Thu 23rd of February, 2017

Tired teens 4.5 times more likely to commit crimes as adults

Teenagers who experience sleep problems and exhibit anti-social behavior are more likely to commit violent crimes as adults, new research concludes. Posted: Thu 23rd of February, 2017

Researchers uncover brain circuitry central to reward-seeking behavior

Scientists have found that as mice learn to associate a particular sound with a rewarding sugary drink, one set of prefrontal neurons becomes more active and promotes reward-seeking behavior while other prefrontal neurons are silenced, and those neurons act like a brake on reward-seeking. Posted: Wed 22nd of February, 2017

Brain-machine interfaces: Bidirectional communication at last

A prosthetic limb controlled by brain activity can partially recover the lost motor function. Neuroscientists asked whether it was possible to transmit the missing sensation back to the brain by stimulating neural activity in the cortex. They discovered that not only was it possible to create an artificial sensation of neuroprosthetic movements, but that the underlying learning process occurs very rapidly. These finding were obtained by resorting to imaging and optical stimulation tools. Posted: Wed 22nd of February, 2017

Scientists survey the state of sleep science

Sleep remains an enduring mystery with major clinical relevance, according to a a recent review. In recent decades, new technologies have allowed neuroscientists to identify multiple brain circuits that govern the sleep/wake cycle, as well as the factors that can influence it, such as caffeine and light. But the brain's complexity is still a stumbling block in understanding this ubiquitous and necessary animal behavior. Posted: Wed 22nd of February, 2017

Itch neurons play a role in managing pain

There are neurons in your skin that are wired to sense itchy things. These neurons are separate from the ones that detect pain, and yet, chemical-induced itch is often accompanied by mild pain such as burning and stinging sensations. But when it comes to sending signals toward your brain through your spinal cord, itch and mild pain can go through the same set of spinal cord neurons. Posted: Wed 22nd of February, 2017

Superfluid is now helping brain surgeons

A superfluid, which resembles brain tissue, makes ultrasound images easier to interpret during an operation. This will make it easier for surgeons to remove brain tumors more accurately, say researchers. Posted: Wed 22nd of February, 2017

Precise inactivation of neural messenger receptor wipes out fear memory in mice

Research combines antibody precision with toxic oxygen burst to inactivate neural protein and temporarily abolish fear memory in mice. Posted: Wed 22nd of February, 2017

Depression puts psoriasis patients at significantly greater risk of psoriatic arthritis

Psoriasis is a lifelong disease that is associated with significant cosmetic and physical disability and puts patients at increased risk for many major medical disorders. A multidisciplinary team of researchers has found that psoriasis patients who developed depression were at a 37 percent greater risk of subsequently developing psoriatic arthritis, compared with psoriasis patients who did not develop depression. Posted: Wed 22nd of February, 2017

tDCS combined with computer games at home reduces cognitive symptoms of multiple sclerosis

A new study reports that participants with multiple sclerosis who used tDCS while playing the cognitive training computer games designed to improve information processing abilities showed significantly greater gains in cognitive measures than those who played the computer games alone. Importantly, the participants completed the cognitive training and tDCS while at home. Posted: Wed 22nd of February, 2017

MRI-guided laser surgery proving effective for some epilepsy patients

The MRI-guided laser ablation method is far less invasive and time-consuming than conventional surgery and has produced good results for people with medial temporal lobe epilepsy, report investigators. Posted: Wed 22nd of February, 2017

Successful insomnia treatment may require nothing more than a placebo

A new study indicates that successful treatment for insomnia may not actually require complicated neurofeedback (direct training of brain functions). Rather, it appears patients who simply believe they're getting neurofeedback training appear to get the same benefits. Posted: Wed 22nd of February, 2017

Drugs that alter inhibitory targets offer therapeutic strategies for autism, schizophrenia

Researchers recently discovered that an inhibitory brain receptor triggers synaptic pruning in adolescence. Drugs that selectively target these receptors, when administered during adolescence, can alter synapse number, with possible implications for the treatment of autism and schizophrenia. Posted: Tue 21st of February, 2017

Psychiatry News -- ScienceDaily

Alzheimer's drug prescribed off-label could pose risk for some

Donepezil, a medication that is approved to treat people with Alzheimer's disease, should not be prescribed for people with mild cognitive impairment without a genetic test. Researchers discovered that for people who carry a specific genetic variation -- the K-variant of butyrylcholinesterase, or BChE-K -- donezpezil could accelerate cognitive decline. Posted: Sat 25th of February, 2017

Teach yourself everyday happiness with imagery training

Researchers have found that self-guided positive imagery training can successfully combat negative emotions in our daily lives. This tool is so powerful that it also changes the way our brain functions. Posted: Fri 24th of February, 2017

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

Several newly discovered variants of a gene increase the risk of developing anxiety disorders. A research team aims to derive new therapies from this finding which are better tailored to the individual patients. Posted: Fri 24th of February, 2017

OCD-like behavior linked to genetic mutation

A new study found evidence suggesting how neural dysfunction in a certain region of the brain can lead to obsessive and repetitive behaviors much like obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Posted: Thu 23rd of February, 2017

Depression puts psoriasis patients at significantly greater risk of psoriatic arthritis

Psoriasis is a lifelong disease that is associated with significant cosmetic and physical disability and puts patients at increased risk for many major medical disorders. A multidisciplinary team of researchers has found that psoriasis patients who developed depression were at a 37 percent greater risk of subsequently developing psoriatic arthritis, compared with psoriasis patients who did not develop depression. Posted: Wed 22nd of February, 2017

Teens with PTSD, conduct disorder have difficulty recognizing facial expressions

Adolescents with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms are more likely to misidentify sad and angry faces as fearful, while teens with symptoms of conduct disorder tend to interpret sad faces as angry, finds a study. Posted: Tue 21st of February, 2017

Post-deployment screening with tailored advice does not help reduce mental health disorders in UK Armed Forces, study finds

Few Armed Forces personnel seek help for mental health disorders and novel approaches will be needed to encourage personnel at risk of PTSD, anxiety and alcohol abuse to seek treatment, suggests a new study. A trial testing a potential post-deployment screening program for UK Armed Forces personnel, based on a computerized assessment and tailored mental health advice, found it was not effective in reducing symptoms of mental health disorders or encouraging personnel to seek help, compared to the general mental health advice which is the standard of care in the UK military. Posted: Fri 17th of February, 2017

Brain differences in ADHD

Largest imaging study of ADHD to date identifies differences in five regions of the brain, with greatest differences seen in children rather than adults. Posted: Thu 16th of February, 2017

Is it depression or dementia? Brain SPECT imaging helps distinguish them

Does a patient have depression or a cognitive disorder (CD) such as Alzheimer's disease or both? Since both disorders have overlapping symptoms, how can a clinician tell them apart to make an appropriate diagnosis? Researchers have found that single photon emission computed tomography, or SPECT, can help to distinguish between these diagnostic categories. Posted: Thu 16th of February, 2017

Depression or anxiety may increase risk of surgical wound complications

Patients' mental health may affect their risk of experiencing wound-related complications after surgery, new research indicates. Posted: Thu 16th of February, 2017

Low birth weight babies at higher risk for mental health problems later in life

Babies born with extremely low birth weight are not only at risk for physical problems but are also more likely to experience mental health problems later in life, according to an analysis of research conducted over nearly 30 years. Posted: Mon 13th of February, 2017

Researchers discover how the brain turns chronic stress into pathological anxiety

In a new study, researchers have described how two important molecules in the brain work together to trigger intense anxiety. Posted: Mon 13th of February, 2017

Caregivers should be screened early, often to prevent depression, anxiety

Currently, more than 34 million people in the U.S. care for terminally ill love ones, but few resources are available to help them navigate the challenges they encounter. A study has found that nearly one-quarter of caregivers were moderately or severely depressed and nearly one-third had moderate or severe anxiety. The researchers recommend that health providers remember to treat the whole family, providing ongoing screening to family caregivers to identify early signs of depression and anxiety. Posted: Fri 10th of February, 2017

Making strides in schizophrenia diagnosis research

Researchers have developed a blood test that could help doctors more quickly diagnose schizophrenia and other disorders. Posted: Thu 9th of February, 2017

PTSD symptoms may be prevented with ketamine

Researchers have evidence that giving a small dose of ketamine one week before a psychologically traumatic event may help prevent PTSD. The study, in mice, may have implications for soldiers who are at risk for trauma and PTSD. Posted: Wed 8th of February, 2017

Depressed patients with earlier and more severe symptoms have high genetic risk for major psychiatric disorders

Clinical features of major depressive disorder (MDD) may help identify specific subgroups of depressed patients based on associations with genetic risk for major psychiatric disorders, reports a study. The study found that patients with an early age at onset and higher symptom severity have an increased genetic risk for MDD, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Posted: Tue 7th of February, 2017

Psychotherapy normalizes the brain in social phobia

Anxiety in social situations is not a rare problem: Around one in ten people are affected by social anxiety disorder during their lifetime. Social anxiety disorder is diagnosed if fears and anxiety in social situations significantly impair everyday life and cause intense suffering. Talking in front of a larger group can be one typical feared situation. A study now reveals that the successful treatment of an anxiety disorder alters key brain structures that are involved in processing and regulating emotions.   Posted: Mon 6th of February, 2017

Volunteering eases veterans' transition to civilian life

The first peer-reviewed and published national study of civic service among U.S. vets who served in Iraq and/or Afghanistan found volunteering improved their health and social life. Posted: Thu 2nd of February, 2017

Parents of children with serious heart defects may be at risk of PTSD

Many parents -- particularly mothers -- of children born with serious heart defects have symptoms of post-traumatic stress, anxiety or depression. Since compromised parental mental health can lead to long-term health and behavioral problems in children, a new study calls for additional research on the severity and persistence of parental mental health problems and to develop screening and training for parents as part of pediatric cardiac care. Posted: Wed 1st of February, 2017

Mediterranean diet linked to a lower risk of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

Dietary patterns of the Mediterranean diet can be related to a lower diagnose of the attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a study. Posted: Wed 1st of February, 2017

Social Psychology News -- ScienceDaily

Values gap in workplace can lead millennials to look elsewhere

Much has been made in popular culture about millennials as they join the working world, including their tendency to job hop. Although this behavior often is explained as a loyalty issue, new research reveals one reason young workers choose to leave a firm is because they find a disconnect between their beliefs and the culture they observe in the workplace. Posted: Thu 23rd of February, 2017

Deprivation in early childhood can affect mental health in adulthood, according to landmark study

Despite living in strong and supportive families for over 20 years, many children exposed to severe early deprivation in Romanian institutions aged 0-3 experience a range of mental health problems in early adulthood. Posted: Thu 23rd of February, 2017

Top professional performance through psychopathy

The term “psychopath” is not flattering: such people are considered cold, manipulative, do not feel any remorse and seek thrills without any fear – and all that at other’s expense. A study is now shattering this image. They claim that a certain form of psychopathy can lead to top professional performance, without harming others or the company. Posted: Thu 23rd of February, 2017

Tired teens 4.5 times more likely to commit crimes as adults

Teenagers who experience sleep problems and exhibit anti-social behavior are more likely to commit violent crimes as adults, new research concludes. Posted: Thu 23rd of February, 2017

We read emotions based on how the eye sees

We use others' eyes -- whether they're widened or narrowed -- to infer emotional states, and the inferences we make align with the optical function of those expressions, according to new research. The research reveals, for example, that people consistently associate narrowed eyes -- which can enhance visual discrimination -- with discrimination-related emotions including disgust and suspicion. Posted: Wed 22nd of February, 2017

Uncertainty perception drives public's trust, mistrust of science

Many policies -- from medicine to terrorism -- depend on how the general public accepts and understands scientific evidence. People view different branches of sciences as having different amounts of uncertainty, which may not reflect the actual uncertainty of the field. Researchers have now taken the first step to understanding more of the whole picture by measuring scientific uncertainty broadly -- across many areas of science, not just topics that are typically polarized. Posted: Wed 22nd of February, 2017

Online daters ignore wish list when choosing a match

Despite having a 'wish list' stating their preference for potential ideal matches, most online daters contact people bearing no resemblance to the characteristics they say they want in a mate, according to new research. The finding was revealed by researchers who analyzed the online dating preferences and contact behavior of more than 41,000 Australians aged between 18-80. Posted: Tue 21st of February, 2017

Students more likely to succeed if teachers have positive perceptions of parents

Researchers have found that teacher ratings of parental involvement early in a child's academic career can accurately predict the child's academic and social success. Posted: Tue 21st of February, 2017

Teens with PTSD, conduct disorder have difficulty recognizing facial expressions

Adolescents with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms are more likely to misidentify sad and angry faces as fearful, while teens with symptoms of conduct disorder tend to interpret sad faces as angry, finds a study. Posted: Tue 21st of February, 2017

Knee-jerk disgust is holding humans back

Disgust is an emotion that's been co-opted to discriminate against people and things which pose no danger, holding humans back in social and evolutionary terms, suggests a new study. Posted: Mon 20th of February, 2017

How humans bond: The brain chemistry revealed

In a new study, researchers found for the first time that the neurotransmitter dopamine is involved in human bonding, bringing the brain's reward system into our understanding of how we form human attachments. The results, based on a study with 19 mother-infant pairs, have important implications for therapies addressing postpartum depression as well as disorders of the dopamine system such as Parkinson's disease, addiction, and social dysfunction. Posted: Fri 17th of February, 2017

How Dads bond with toddlers: Brain scans link oxytocin to paternal nurturing

Fathers given boosts of the hormone oxytocin show increased activity in brain regions associated with reward and empathy when viewing photos of their toddlers, a new study finds. Posted: Fri 17th of February, 2017

Social exclusion leads to conspiratorial thinking, study finds

Social exclusion leads to conspiratorial thinking, research shows. Feelings of despair brought on by social exclusion can cause people to seek meaning in miraculous stories, which may not necessarily be true. Posted: Thu 16th of February, 2017

Social exclusion in virtual realities has a negative social and emotional impact in 'real' life

In this age of highly realistic computer games and increasingly popular social networks, social exclusion in virtual worlds is becoming more and more socially significant, as is demonstrated by the growing number of "cyber mobbing" cases. However, up until now, very little research has been carried out into the impact of social exclusion in the digital world upon real-life social behavior, and hardly any that addresses the latest developments such as Virtual Reality (VR) glasses. A study has now shown that exclusion from a virtual group has a significant negative impact upon willingness to help and social distance in the real world. Posted: Thu 16th of February, 2017

People assume sexists are also racist and vice versa

The stigma associated with prejudice against women and people of color seems to transfer from one group to another, according to new findings. In a series of experiments, researchers found that women tended to believe that a person who espoused racist beliefs would also show sexist beliefs and behavior, while men of color believed that someone who expressed sexist attitudes was likely to show racist tendencies. Posted: Thu 16th of February, 2017

Outdoor adventure program is a promising treatment for Autism Spectrum Disorder

A new study finds outdoor challenge-based interventions may be effective in reducing the overall severity of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) symptoms. Posted: Wed 15th of February, 2017

To please your friends, tell them what they already know

We love to tell friends and family about experiences we've had and they haven't -- from exotic vacations to celebrity sightings -- but new research suggests that these stories don't thrill them quite as much as we imagine. A series of studies shows that both speakers and listeners expect novel stories to be bigger crowd pleasers, but that listeners end up enjoying familiar stories more. Posted: Tue 14th of February, 2017

Population density pushes the 'slow life'

One psychological effect of population density is for those people living in urban areas to adopt a 'slow life strategy.' This strategy focuses more on planning for the long-term future and includes tactics like preferring long-term romantic relationships, having fewer children and investing more in education. Posted: Tue 14th of February, 2017

Low birth weight babies at higher risk for mental health problems later in life

Babies born with extremely low birth weight are not only at risk for physical problems but are also more likely to experience mental health problems later in life, according to an analysis of research conducted over nearly 30 years. Posted: Mon 13th of February, 2017

Married people have lower levels of stress hormone

Married people are healthier than those who are single, divorced or widowed, research has found. Now a new study provides the first biological evidence to explain how marriage impacts health. Posted: Mon 13th of February, 2017

Child Psychology News -- ScienceDaily

The making of music

A new study suggests that music -- and specifically infant-directed song -- evolved as a way for parents to signal to children that their needs are being met, while still freeing up parents to perform other tasks, like foraging for food, or caring for other offspring. Posted: Fri 24th of February, 2017

What Effect Does Prenatal and Postpartum Maternal Depression Have on Children?

The results of a large study do not support the notion that prenatal and postpartum maternal depression is particularly detrimental to children's psychological development. Instead, the most robust effects were found for maternal depression occurring during children's preschool years. Posted: Fri 24th of February, 2017

Removing barriers to early intervention for autistic children: A new model shows promise

Acting on recommendations from the South Carolina Act Early Team, South Carolina changed its policies to pay for early intensive behavioral intervention in children under three revealed to be at high risk for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) by a two-stage screening process. Previously, a formal diagnosis of ASD had been required. As a result, the number of children under three receiving early intervention grew five-fold. Posted: Thu 23rd of February, 2017

Sons of cocaine-using fathers have profound memory impairments

Fathers who use cocaine at the time of conceiving a child may be putting their sons at risk of learning disabilities and memory loss. The researchers say the findings reveal that drug abuse by fathers -- separate from the well-established effects of cocaine use in mothers -- may negatively impact cognitive development in their male offspring. Posted: Thu 23rd of February, 2017

Deprivation in early childhood can affect mental health in adulthood, according to landmark study

Despite living in strong and supportive families for over 20 years, many children exposed to severe early deprivation in Romanian institutions aged 0-3 experience a range of mental health problems in early adulthood. Posted: Thu 23rd of February, 2017

Tired teens 4.5 times more likely to commit crimes as adults

Teenagers who experience sleep problems and exhibit anti-social behavior are more likely to commit violent crimes as adults, new research concludes. Posted: Thu 23rd of February, 2017

Autism risk linked to herpes infection during pregnancy

Women actively infected with genital herpes during early pregnancy had twice the odds of giving birth to a child later diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), according to a study. Posted: Wed 22nd of February, 2017

We read emotions based on how the eye sees

We use others' eyes -- whether they're widened or narrowed -- to infer emotional states, and the inferences we make align with the optical function of those expressions, according to new research. The research reveals, for example, that people consistently associate narrowed eyes -- which can enhance visual discrimination -- with discrimination-related emotions including disgust and suspicion. Posted: Wed 22nd of February, 2017

Brain scans could predict teens’ problem drug use before it starts

There's an idea out there of what a drug-addled teen is supposed to look like: impulsive, unconscientious, smart, perhaps -- but not the most engaged. While personality traits like that could signal danger, not every adolescent who fits that description becomes a problem drug user. So how do you tell who's who? Posted: Wed 22nd of February, 2017

No spoilers! Most people don't want to know their future

Given the chance to see into the future, most people would rather not know what life has in store for them, even if they think those events could make them happy, according to new research. Posted: Wed 22nd of February, 2017

Depression puts psoriasis patients at significantly greater risk of psoriatic arthritis

Psoriasis is a lifelong disease that is associated with significant cosmetic and physical disability and puts patients at increased risk for many major medical disorders. A multidisciplinary team of researchers has found that psoriasis patients who developed depression were at a 37 percent greater risk of subsequently developing psoriatic arthritis, compared with psoriasis patients who did not develop depression. Posted: Wed 22nd of February, 2017

Cat ownership not linked to mental health problems

New research has found no link between cat ownership and psychotic symptoms, casting doubt on previous suggestions that people who grew up with cats are at higher risk of mental illness. Posted: Wed 22nd of February, 2017

Anti-epilepsy medicine taken by pregnant women does not harm the child's overall health

Previous studies have shown that anti-epilepsy medicine may lead to congenital malformations in the fetus and that the use of anti-epilepsy medicine during pregnancy affects the development of the brain among the children. There is still a lack of knowledge in the area about the general health of children who are exposed to anti-epilepsy medicine in fetal life. But this new study is generally reassuring for women who need to take anti-epilepsy medicine during their pregnancy. Posted: Tue 21st of February, 2017

Growing number of teens think getting heroin is 'probably impossible'

How easy do adolescents think it is to get heroin? A researcher examines how their perceptions have changed from 2002 to 2014. Posted: Tue 21st of February, 2017

Family focused interventions for at risk children and youth

Experts discuss how interventions can be developed to maximize resilience among children experiencing adversity and improve outcomes for their families as well. Posted: Tue 21st of February, 2017

Nationwide teen bullying and cyberbullying study reveals significant issues impacting youth

In one of the latest and most ambitious studies on bullying and cyberbullying in middle and high school students, researchers found that 1 in 5 students said that they had been threatened with a weapon at school, 73 percent of students reported that they had been bullied at school at some point in their lifetime, and 70 percent of the students said that someone spread rumors about them online. Posted: Tue 21st of February, 2017

Maths and maps make you nervous? It could be in your genes

Our genes play a significant role in how anxious we feel when faced with spatial and mathematical tasks, such as reading a map or solving a geometry problem, according to a new study. Posted: Tue 21st of February, 2017

Students more likely to succeed if teachers have positive perceptions of parents

Researchers have found that teacher ratings of parental involvement early in a child's academic career can accurately predict the child's academic and social success. Posted: Tue 21st of February, 2017

Fingerprinting young brains: New leads for mental disorders

Like a fingerprint, the connections of the human brain render us distinct from one another. In a study just published in Nature Neuroscience, researchers from the University of Oslo revealed that such a unique, fingerprint-like pattern evolves during development and is sensitive to mental health. These findings suggest that such brain network maturation during the course of childhood and adolescence reflects an important aspect of healthy brain development, and may help develop better tools for finding the right diagnosis and treatments of mental illness. Posted: Tue 21st of February, 2017

New behavioral therapy to support Japanese mothers of children with ADHD

Researchers have successfully adapted a parent-training program for ADHD for use with families in Japan, where ADHD-specific behavioral interventions are limited. Posted: Tue 21st of February, 2017