Centre for philosophical psychology

Today’s peripheral psychology for example cognitive psychology the general to general knowledge.

Traditionally, cognitive psychology includes human perception, attention, learning, memory, concept formation, reasoning, judgment and decision-making, problem solving, and language processing. For some, social and cultural factors, emotion, consciousness, animal cognition, evolutionary approaches have also become part of cognitive psychology. Cognitive psychology is the scientific investigation of human cognition, that is, all our mental abilities – perceiving, learning, remembering, thinking, reasoning, and understanding. The term “cognition” stems from the Latin word “ cognoscere” or "to know". Fundamentally, cognitive psychology studies how people acquire and apply knowledge or information. It is closely related to the highly interdisciplinary cognitive science and influenced by artificial intelligence, computer science, philosophy, anthropology, linguistics, biology, physics, and neuroscience. Cognitive psychology research has produced an extensive body of principles, representations, and algorithms. Successful applications range from custom-built expert systems to mass-produced software and consumer electronics: (1) Development of computer interfaces that collaborate with users to meet their information needs and operate as intelligent agents, (2)Development of a flexible information infrastructure based on knowledge representation and reasoning methods, (3) Development of smart tools in the financial industry, (4) Development of mobile, intelligent robots that can perform tasks usually reserved for humans, (5) Development of bionic components of the perceptual and cognitive neural system such as cochlear and retinal implants. Till this point , it assist the human daily life physical need. There is need with in the human to develop positive psychology . Unifying practice here will disseminate ample light about its existence in comman public in its true form the then philosophical psychology toword the eternity, base to last

   

updating soon....

Psychology Research News -- ScienceDaily

The lasting effects of ministrokes may contribute to dementia

Investigators report preclinical research showing that microinfarcts induce prolonged dysfunction in brain areas estimated to be 12-times larger than the visible injury site. Data from c-Fos assays and in vivo hemodynamic imaging reveal how individually miniscule microinfarcts might collectively contribute to broader brain dysfunction in patients with vascular cognitive impairment and dementia. Posted: Mon 16th of January, 2017

New research study creates new opportunities for treating brain diseases

Immunotherapy has proven to be effective against many serious diseases. But to treat diseases in the brain, the antibodies must first get past the obstacle of the blood-brain barrier. In a new study, a research group describes their development of a new antibody design that increases brain uptake of antibodies almost 100-fold. Posted: Mon 16th of January, 2017

One in five young people lose sleep over social media

One in five young people regularly wake up in the night to send or check messages on social media, according to new research. This night-time activity is making teenagers three times more likely to feel constantly tired at school than their peers who do not log on at night, and could be affecting their happiness and wellbeing. Posted: Mon 16th of January, 2017

Older, fitter adults experience greater brain activity while learning

Older adults who experience good cardiac fitness may be also keeping their brains in good shape as well. In what is believed to be the first study of its kind, older adults who scored high on cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) tests performed better on memory tasks than those who had low CRF. Further, the more fit older adults were, the more active their brain was during learning. Posted: Fri 13th of January, 2017

Multiregional brain on a chip

A multiregional brain-on-a-chip that models the connectivity between three distinct regions of the brain has been revealed by researchers. The in vitro model was used to extensively characterize the differences between neurons from different regions of the brain and to mimic the system's connectivity. Posted: Fri 13th of January, 2017

Sensory stimuli control dopamine in the brain

The type and intensity of stimuli control the activity of nerve cells that release the neurotransmitter dopamine, report scientists. Posted: Fri 13th of January, 2017

Found: Neurons that orient bats toward destination

Bats – like humans – can find their favorite fruit stand (or coffee shop) even when it’s hidden behind a screen or tall buildings. How? Scientists have now identified the neurons that point bats in the right direction, even when their destination is obscured. This could aid understanding of some aspects of Alzheimer’s. Posted: Thu 12th of January, 2017

New system for forming memories

Until now, the hippocampus was considered the most important brain region for forming and recalling memory, with other regions only contributing as subordinates. But a new study finds that a brain region called entorhinal cortex plays a new and independent role in memory. Researchers showed that, in rats, the entorhinal cortex replays memories of movement independent of input from the hippocampus. Posted: Thu 12th of January, 2017

Viruses in genome important for our brain

Over millions of years retroviruses have been incorporated into our human DNA, where they today make up almost 10 per cent of the total genome. A research group has now discovered a mechanism through which these retroviruses may have an impact on gene expression. This means that they may have played a significant role in the development of the human brain as well as in various neurological diseases. Posted: Thu 12th of January, 2017

Link found between concussions, Alzheimer's disease

Concussions accelerate Alzheimer's disease-related brain atrophy and cognitive decline in people who are at genetic risk for the condition, research has found. The findings show promise for detecting the influence of concussion on neurodegeneration. Posted: Thu 12th of January, 2017

How stress may increase risk of heart disease and stroke

Heightened activity in the amygdala -- a region of the brain involved in stress -- is associated with a greater risk of heart disease and stroke, according to a study that provides new insights into the possible mechanism by which stress can lead to cardiovascular disease in humans. Posted: Thu 12th of January, 2017

New guideline on how to map brain prior to epilepsy surgery

Before epilepsy surgery, doctors may consider using brain imaging to locate language and memory functions in the brain instead of the more invasive procedure that is commonly used, according to a guideline. It is the first evidence-based guideline that systematically reviewed all evidence for such an evaluation. Posted: Wed 11th of January, 2017

Study unveils how stress may increase risk of heart disease and stroke

Heightened activity in the amygdala - a region of the brain involved in stress - is associated with a greater risk of heart disease and stroke, according to a new study. Posted: Wed 11th of January, 2017

A glimpse into the workings of the baby brain

Neuroscientists have adapted their MRI scanner to make it easier to scan infants' brains as the babies watch movies featuring different types of visual input. Posted: Wed 11th of January, 2017

Our senses can't learn under stress

Stress is part of our everyday lives. While some thrive on it, it makes others sick. But what does stress do to our senses? Posted: Wed 11th of January, 2017

Drug shown to aid injured adult brains may exacerbate cognitive problems in children

The pediatric brain responds negatively to traumatic brain injury treatment that targets inflammation, new research suggests. Posted: Tue 10th of January, 2017

New molecular discovery may help identify drug therapies to prevent dementia

Scientists have discovered a molecular pathway in the brain that may help provide answers to long-term memory problems in the elderly and aid researchers in identifying drug-based therapies to prevent dementia. Posted: Tue 10th of January, 2017

'Housekeepers' of the brain renew themselves more quickly than first thought

Cells in the brain responsible for detecting and fixing minor damage renew themselves more quickly than previously thought, new research has shown. Posted: Tue 10th of January, 2017

Suppressing a DNA-repairing protein in brain could be key to treating aggressive tumors

Inhibiting a DNA-repairing protein in brain could be key to treating aggressive tumors, say researchers. Posted: Tue 10th of January, 2017

Glia, not neurons, are most affected by brain aging

The difference between an old brain and a young brain isn't so much the number of neurons but the presence and function of supporting cells called glia. In a new article, researchers who examined postmortem brain samples from 480 individuals ranging in age from 16 to 106 found that the state of someone's glia is so consistent through the years that it can be used to predict someone's age. Posted: Tue 10th of January, 2017

Psychiatry News -- ScienceDaily

In teens, strong friendships may mitigate depression associated with excessive video gaming

Teenagers who play video games for more than four hours a day suffer from symptoms of depression, but frequent use of social media and instant messaging may mitigate symptoms of game addiction in these teens, new research suggests. Posted: Thu 12th of January, 2017

How stress may increase risk of heart disease and stroke

Heightened activity in the amygdala -- a region of the brain involved in stress -- is associated with a greater risk of heart disease and stroke, according to a study that provides new insights into the possible mechanism by which stress can lead to cardiovascular disease in humans. Posted: Thu 12th of January, 2017

Study unveils how stress may increase risk of heart disease and stroke

Heightened activity in the amygdala - a region of the brain involved in stress - is associated with a greater risk of heart disease and stroke, according to a new study. Posted: Wed 11th of January, 2017

High rates of PTSD and other mental health problems after great east Japan earthquake

The devastating 2011 earthquake, tsunami, and resulting nuclear disaster in Japan had a high mental health impact -- with some effects persisting several years later, according to a comprehensive research. Posted: Mon 9th of January, 2017

Research reveals help for eating disorder patients

More people are dying from eating disorders than any other psychiatric disorder, and professor has discovered a way to help women by significantly reducing eating disorder symptoms in those who are struggling. Posted: Fri 6th of January, 2017

Identifying children at risk of eating disorders is key to saving lives

Spotting eating disorder symptoms in children as young as nine years old will allow medics to intervene early and save lives, experts say. Posted: Thu 5th of January, 2017

Most veterans experience good quality of life after military service

With a few notable exceptions, the majority of post-9/11 US veterans appear to do well in regards to work and family quality of life after departing from military service despite their exposure to the war zone, a study has concluded. Posted: Wed 4th of January, 2017

Witnessing fear in others can physically change brain

Scientists have discovered that observing fear in others may change how information flows in the brain. The finding in a rodent model may have bearing on people who suffer post-traumatic stress disorder. Posted: Wed 4th of January, 2017

Gaming your brain to treat depression

Researchers have found promising results for treating depression with a video game interface that targets underlying cognitive issues associated with depression rather than just managing the symptoms. Posted: Wed 4th of January, 2017

Genes affecting our communication skills relate to genes for schizophrenia and autism

By screening thousands of individuals, an international team led by researchers has provided new insights into the relationship between genes that confer risk for autism or schizophrenia and genes that influence our ability to communicate during the course of development. Posted: Tue 3rd of January, 2017

'Friendship Bench' program proves effective at alleviating mental illness symptoms

Brief psychological treatment delivered by Zimbabwean lay health workers dramatically improved the symptoms of patients with mental health problems, according to new research. Posted: Thu 29th of December, 2016

Psychiatric conditions linked to increased risk of long-term opioid use

A wide range of pre-existing psychiatric and behavioral conditions and the use of psychoactive drugs could be important risk factors leading to long-term use of opioid pain medications. Posted: Thu 29th of December, 2016

A cure for social anxiety disorders

Social phobia is the most common anxiety disorder of our time. But the current treatment regimen for patients with this diagnosis has not proven very effective. Now a team of researchers believes they have found a cure for social anxiety disorders. Posted: Wed 21st of December, 2016

Multi-social millennials more likely depressed than social(media)ly conservative peers

Compared with the total time spent on social media, use of multiple platforms is more strongly associated with depression and anxiety among young adults, researchers have found in a national survey. People who report using seven to 11 social media platforms had more than three times the risk of depression and anxiety than their peers who use zero to two platforms, even after adjusting for the total time spent on social media overall. Posted: Tue 20th of December, 2016

Paternal aging and its possible link to neurodevelopmental disorders

Neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are on the rise, but its underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. A new comprehensive behavioral analyses asks if this increase could be connect to paternal aging. Posted: Mon 19th of December, 2016

Early life social stress has long-term impact on brain networks in rats

Investigators in veterinary and human medicine have uncovered long-term changes in the brains of adult female rats exposed to social stresses early in life, with the biggest impact on regions of the brain linked to social behavior, stress, emotion and depression. The findings will enable researchers to begin testing preventative measures and treatments for depression and anxiety. Posted: Mon 19th of December, 2016

This is your brain on (legal) cannabis: Researchers seek answers

For those suffering depression or anxiety, using cannabis for relief may not be the long-term answer, say researchers. Posted: Fri 16th of December, 2016

Social anxiety disorders? Cognitive therapy most effective treatment

Social phobia is the most common anxiety disorder of our time. But the current treatment regimen for patients with this diagnosis has not proven very effective. Researchers spent 10 years studying alternative treatments to find that cognitive therapy works best for social anxiety disorders. Posted: Fri 16th of December, 2016

Sleep helps process traumatic experiences

If we sleep in the first 24 hours after a traumatic experience, this may help process and integrate the distressing memories more effectively, as researchers demonstrate in a new study. Sleep could thus be used as an early prevention strategy for post-traumatic stress disorders. Posted: Tue 13th of December, 2016

How many adults in the United States are taking psychiatric drugs?

About 1 in 6 adults in the United States reported taking psychiatric drugs at least once during 2013, according to a new research study. Posted: Mon 12th of December, 2016

Social Psychology News -- ScienceDaily

One in five young people lose sleep over social media

One in five young people regularly wake up in the night to send or check messages on social media, according to new research. This night-time activity is making teenagers three times more likely to feel constantly tired at school than their peers who do not log on at night, and could be affecting their happiness and wellbeing. Posted: Mon 16th of January, 2017

Thinking of changing your behavior in 2017? Try moving first

The time for successful habit change isn't based on the calendar, but on big changes to our everyday lives like moving to a new home, new research shows. Posted: Fri 13th of January, 2017

Large scale study highlights challenges faced by children with ASD in early school years

New research outlined in a report stems from one of the largest studies on young children with ASD as they transition into school. Posted: Fri 13th of January, 2017

Online dating booming but how much does education matter?

Online daters are most likely to contact people with the same level of education as them, but are less fussy about an intellectual match as they get older, according to new research. Posted: Thu 12th of January, 2017

In teens, strong friendships may mitigate depression associated with excessive video gaming

Teenagers who play video games for more than four hours a day suffer from symptoms of depression, but frequent use of social media and instant messaging may mitigate symptoms of game addiction in these teens, new research suggests. Posted: Thu 12th of January, 2017

Problem drinking in older adults

Older adults suffering from multiple chronic health conditions and depression are nearly five times as likely to be problem drinkers as older adults with the same conditions and no depression. Posted: Thu 12th of January, 2017

Instagram documents rising hookah use

Social media is giving researchers insight into the rising use of hookah, according to a study. Hookah, smoked through a water pipe and also known as shisha, has harmful health effects similar to cigarettes. But as cigarette use declined between 2005 and 2015 in the US, hookah use increased. New data from social media documents thousands of people using hookah in social settings and nightlife establishments using social media to promote hookah use. Posted: Thu 12th of January, 2017

Superhero culture magnifies aggressive, not defending behaviors

Children who frequently engage with superhero culture are more likely to be physically and relationally aggressive one year later and not more likely to be defenders of kids being picked on by bullies, new research concludes. Posted: Wed 11th of January, 2017

Play, cognitive skills in kindergarten predict extracurricular activities in middle school

Cognitive skills and experiences like classroom-based play in kindergarten lead to participation in extracurricular activities in 8th grade among children growing up in poverty, finds a new study. Posted: Tue 10th of January, 2017

What kind of selfie taker are you?

Taking and posting pictures of yourself doesn't necessarily mean you're a narcissist, new research suggests. People also take selfies to engage in conversations and chronicle their lives. Posted: Tue 10th of January, 2017

Biological changes could underlie higher psychosis risk in immigrants

A new study could explain how migrating to another country increases a person's risk of developing schizophrenia, by altering brain chemistry. Immigrants had higher levels of the brain chemical dopamine than non-immigrants in the study; abnormal dopamine levels are linked to symptoms of schizophrenia, say the researchers. Posted: Tue 10th of January, 2017

New framework could help online addicts reduce their usage

Research has shown that internet addicts do not always feel guilty about their usage, and in many cases, they do not even perceive their usage as problematic. A new model could help addicts realize that their usage is a problem and reduce it. Posted: Mon 9th of January, 2017

Neonicotinoid pesticide affects foraging and social interaction in bumblebees

Changes in social behavior have been observed in bees with sublethal exposure to the neonicotinoid pesticide, imidacloprid, report scientists. Posted: Sat 7th of January, 2017

As neighborhood status falls, cardiovascular disease risk among black residents spikes

A new study found that significant increases in cardiovascular disease was linked to black residents of neighborhood with lower socioeconomic status and higher levels of violence and disorder. Posted: Wed 4th of January, 2017

Out in the cold: Why are the oldest people the most excluded?

People over the age of 85 are significantly more likely to suffer social exclusion than those in the 65 to 84-year-old bracket, according to new research. In a study of 10,000 people aged over 65, social policy researchers found the 'oldest old' -- those 85 and over -- have more trouble accessing services such as healthcare and food shops, with 16 percent reporting 'significant' problems, compared with only four percent of their younger counterparts. Posted: Wed 4th of January, 2017

Genes affecting our communication skills relate to genes for schizophrenia and autism

By screening thousands of individuals, an international team led by researchers has provided new insights into the relationship between genes that confer risk for autism or schizophrenia and genes that influence our ability to communicate during the course of development. Posted: Tue 3rd of January, 2017

A social reboot for illegal downloaders

Unauthorized downloading of digital goods, including copyright music, videos, computer games, and images has become an increasing problem for content providers and those who hold the copyright on such goods and expect remuneration for distribution. A new research study suggests that content providers must take a pragmatic view based on social consensus to persuade illicit downloaders that their behavior is economically and ethically unacceptable behavior among their peer group or other social group to which they belong. Posted: Tue 3rd of January, 2017

Maternal depression across the first years of life impacts children’s neural basis of empathy

Exposure to early and chronic maternal depression markedly increases a child’s susceptibility to psychopathology and social-emotional problems, including social withdrawal, poor emotion regulation, and reduced empathy to others. Since 15-18% of women in industrial societies and up to 30% in developing countries suffer from maternal depression, it is of clinical and public health concern to understand the effects of maternal depression on children’s development. Posted: Tue 3rd of January, 2017

Most doctors ignore one of the most potent ways to improve health

Leveraging existing relationships with friends and family may be a more effective way to improve patients' health and encourage new healthy habits and behaviors than increasing interactions with physicians or other clinicians. In a new perspective article, behavioral economists suggest a five-step ladder to effectively engineering social engagements that promote health and to test their acceptability and effectiveness. Posted: Thu 29th of December, 2016

How the brain processes faces from sight to recognition

Researchers used highly sophisticated brain imaging tools and computational methods to measure the real-time brain processes that convert the appearance of a face into the recognition of an individual. They are hopeful that the findings might be used in the near future to locate the exact point at which the visual perception system breaks down in different disorders and injuries, ranging from developmental dyslexia to prosopagnosia, or face blindness. Posted: Tue 27th of December, 2016

Child Psychology News -- ScienceDaily

Retail therapy for jealous partners

When people in a relationships feel jealous about the attention their partners are receiving, they are more likely to purchase eye-grabbing products. This is an attempt to recapture the attention of their partners, new research suggests. Posted: Mon 16th of January, 2017

One in five young people lose sleep over social media

One in five young people regularly wake up in the night to send or check messages on social media, according to new research. This night-time activity is making teenagers three times more likely to feel constantly tired at school than their peers who do not log on at night, and could be affecting their happiness and wellbeing. Posted: Mon 16th of January, 2017

Large scale study highlights challenges faced by children with ASD in early school years

New research outlined in a report stems from one of the largest studies on young children with ASD as they transition into school. Posted: Fri 13th of January, 2017

Gifted students benefit from ability grouping

Schools should use both ability grouping and acceleration to help academically talented students, reports a new study that examined a century of research looking at the controversial subject. Posted: Fri 13th of January, 2017

Increased cooperation between preschool, CHC to identify children with mental health problems

It is beneficial to systematize the exchange of information between parents, preschool and child care centres (CHCs) to increase the focus on young children with mental health problems, research concludes. Posted: Fri 13th of January, 2017

Biomarker in pregnant women linked to depression, low fetal birth weight

Depression is very common during pregnancy, with as many as one in seven women suffering from the illness and more than a half million women impacted by postpartum depression in the U.S. alone. The disorder not only affects the mother’s mood, but has also been linked to influencing the newborn’s development, according to recent research. In a study, researchers found that BDNF levels change during pregnancy, and can cause depression in the mother and low birth weight in the baby. Posted: Thu 12th of January, 2017

In teens, strong friendships may mitigate depression associated with excessive video gaming

Teenagers who play video games for more than four hours a day suffer from symptoms of depression, but frequent use of social media and instant messaging may mitigate symptoms of game addiction in these teens, new research suggests. Posted: Thu 12th of January, 2017

Do dogs of all ages respond equally to dog-directed speech?

People tend to talk to dogs as though they are human babies. A new study shows that people speak more slowly and with a higher tone to dogs of all ages -- both adults and puppies -- and that puppies respond most readily to this dog-directed speech. Posted: Wed 11th of January, 2017

A glimpse into the workings of the baby brain

Neuroscientists have adapted their MRI scanner to make it easier to scan infants' brains as the babies watch movies featuring different types of visual input. Posted: Wed 11th of January, 2017

Gun violence in PG-13 movies continues to climb past R-rated films

The amount of gun violence in top-grossing PG-13 movies has continued to exceed the gun violence in the biggest box-office R-rated films, an analysis shows. What increasingly differentiates the gun violence in PG-13 movies from those rated R is not just frequency but these films' 'erasure of the consequences' such as blood and suffering and the involvement of comic book-inspired heroes and antiheroes. Posted: Wed 11th of January, 2017

Superhero culture magnifies aggressive, not defending behaviors

Children who frequently engage with superhero culture are more likely to be physically and relationally aggressive one year later and not more likely to be defenders of kids being picked on by bullies, new research concludes. Posted: Wed 11th of January, 2017

Psychology: Playful people are at an advantage

Adults can positively utilise their inclination towards playfulness in many situations. They are good at observing, can easily see things from new perspectives, and can turn monotonous tasks into something interesting. At the same time, playfulness should not be equated with humor. Instead we need a new vocabulary to describe it, write psychologists. Posted: Wed 11th of January, 2017

Drug shown to aid injured adult brains may exacerbate cognitive problems in children

The pediatric brain responds negatively to traumatic brain injury treatment that targets inflammation, new research suggests. Posted: Tue 10th of January, 2017

Play, cognitive skills in kindergarten predict extracurricular activities in middle school

Cognitive skills and experiences like classroom-based play in kindergarten lead to participation in extracurricular activities in 8th grade among children growing up in poverty, finds a new study. Posted: Tue 10th of January, 2017

Researchers concerned about young people's responsibility for their work ability

Young people in working life see themselves as solo players responsible for maintaining their own work ability. They regard themselves as holding the ball when the job requires new knowledge and motivation, according to research. Posted: Tue 10th of January, 2017

Biological changes could underlie higher psychosis risk in immigrants

A new study could explain how migrating to another country increases a person's risk of developing schizophrenia, by altering brain chemistry. Immigrants had higher levels of the brain chemical dopamine than non-immigrants in the study; abnormal dopamine levels are linked to symptoms of schizophrenia, say the researchers. Posted: Tue 10th of January, 2017

Brain impairments in premature infants may begin in the womb

Even before they are born, premature babies may display alterations in the circuitry of their developing brains, according to a first-of-its kind research study. Posted: Mon 9th of January, 2017

Association between insufficient sleep, gestational diabetes mellitus discovered

A new health link has been found between short sleep during pregnancy and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). This is the first study to examine the relationship between sleep duration and GDM in a multi-ethnic Asian population. Findings suggest that addressing sleep concerns during pregnancy could potentially reduce the risk of developing GDM. Posted: Mon 9th of January, 2017

Is student debt responsible for 'boomeranging' among young adults?

While student loan debt has reached an all-time high, it does not increase young adults' risk of 'boomeranging' or returning to their parental home, according to a study. Boomerangers, surprisingly, had less student loan debt than young adults who didn't return home. However, researchers found that the link between debt and boomeranging varied by ethnicity, finding an increased risk of boomeranging among black, but not white, youth. Posted: Fri 6th of January, 2017

Counseling, antidepressants change personality (for the better), team reports

A review of 207 studies involving more than 20,000 people found that those who engaged in therapeutic interventions were, on average, significantly less neurotic and a bit more extraverted after the interventions than they were beforehand. Posted: Fri 6th of January, 2017